Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860
Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860

Engraved Gorge Cased Carriage Clock by Soldano Circa 1860

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Repeating carriage clock with alarm by Soldano with movement by Honore Pons and retailed by Penlington and Hutton of Liverpool.

An extremely fine high quality carriage clock by Soldano.

The case is gilt brass in Gorge pattern and is fully engraved with extremely fine tight floral engraving with matting a floriet patterning. The case is glazed with deep bevelled glasses which are all in perfect condition.

The dial is white enamel with light blue floral details to the centre.  The numerals are Roman.  The spade hands are of blued steel.  The dial is mounted with a gilt brass dial mask which is tightly engraved to match the case.  The dial is signed ‘Penlington & Hutton – Liverpool’.

The movement is of superb quality and is signed by Honore Pons – Paris with his mark proudly displaying the ‘Medaille D’ore’ from 1837.  The Pons movement number is 1070.

The platform is signed by Soldano and numbered 175, as is the movement.  The platform is of one of the finest types seen on a carriage clock of this date.  Soldano had his platforms produced in Switzerland and was known for the level of finish and quality.

This clock whilst retailed in Liverpool by Penlington & Hutton would have been produced by Soldano.  J Soldano was known to buy movements by the finest Paris makers and to combine them with the finest Swiss platforms before finishing them in house to the highest standard.  This clock is no exception to this and is proudly numbered and signed by both parties.

Dimensions: Height Handle Up 6 1/2″,  Height Handel Down 5 1/4″, x Width 3 1/4″, x Depth 2 3/4″.

Duration: 8 – Day

Functions: Strike, Repeat, Alarm.

 

 

 

 

 

J. Soldano - Paris & Geneva. 

Paris Exhibitions, Bronze Medals 1855 and 1878 for carriage clocks.  "The Exhibition of this establishment showed substantial progress in the art of case decoration.  On show were a group of carriage clocks ornamented with great taste and originality.  The finish of these movements was conventional, but the escapements appeared to us to have been treated with particular care.  Several items merited the highest praise." (Revue Chronometrique, 1880, p.70, report on 1878 Exhib.)  The same Revue says that Soldano used both Franche-Comte and Saint-Nicolas roulants.

Repeating carriage clock seen with trademark and "J. SOLDANO" on the escapement platform.  Brevet No. 107,046 (3rd March 1875) is for "Veuve de Soldano fils.  Mouvements de pendule de voyage a quarts, a grande sonnerie et a repetition a minutes".  Dent's of Cockspur St. were regular customers of Soldano circa 1860-1865.  Soldano's gongs were often made by "M.V."  The beautiful "J.S." escapements usually found in Soldano clocks were in all probability produced for him in Switzerland.

Pons (Honore; otherwise Pons-de-Paul) - Paris & St-Nicolas-d'Aliermont.

Early 19th century.  Pons was brought to Sain-Nicolas-d'Aliermont in 1806 by the Minister of the Interior in order to re-organise the flagging industry there.  The Tribune Chronometrique, page 91 mentions the arrival of Pons at St-Nicolas in 1806, saying that until then small clocks were made there "badly enough", but that Pons changed all this, and that it was to him in the first place that France largely owed her important clock export trade.  Since 1830, says the Tribune, the blancs-roulants produced under the control of Pons have been constantly improved, the tooth-forms which he introduced being particuarly exact and even ordinary clocks made under his direction well ahead, as usual, of those made by others.  The Rapport du Jury Central, on the occasion of the 1823 Paris Exhibition, makes it plain that even by then Pons was already specialising in machine-made movements "pour pendules portatives" made in conjunction with various escapements ("...echappements mixtes combines par M. Pons lui meme").  Pons won Silver Medals in 1819 and 1823, and a Gold Medal in 1834.  He received the Legion d'Honneur in recognition of his services to French horology.  Pons abdicated in favour of Delephine sometime after 1844 (probably in 1847).  The Revue Chronometrique (Vol.III, Oct. 1859, p60) says that Delphine continued to use the name of Pons on all his models.

Texts taken from 'Carriage Clocks - Their History and Development' by Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert.